Sigrid releases debut full-length ‘Sucker Punch’

Sigrid
Sucker Punch

Universal Island Records · March 8, 2019

Sucker Punch is the best spoonful of sugar to help the heartbreak go down.


Do you overthink relationships? Are you dying to learn how to live in the moment? Ever have had trouble letting go of relationships, even if it is what’s best for you? Are you done with people telling you who you should be?

Well, if you answered yes to any these questions, then Sucker Punch is exactly what the doctor ordered.

Each song in Sigrid’s debut album tells a story about overcoming all of the above. She focuses on the effects of coming to terms with the reality of a relationship, all while providing listeners with golden-hour bops, and new additions to your breakup playlist. The Norwegian singer/songwriter turns emotional baggage into wondrous and relatable jams for all listeners. And in the midst of her work, she uses this opportunity to tackle the demands of the music industry and those who think they know what’s best for her, and her music.

The album’s opening song, “Sucker Punch,” sharing the title of the record, carries a heavy bass throughout the song, truly feeling like a sucker punch to your face and your heart. It sets the tone for the whole album, portraying the classic tale of realizing how much you like someone, with a combination of fearing and anticipating the relationship’s final destination. The following track, “Mine Right Now,” continues the opening song’s themes. Kicking off with an a cappella style, the song showcases Sigrid’s naturally seamless vocals, also carrying the weight of anxiety that comes with the inability to know how a relationship will diminish. But as the pace of the track picks up, so does the artist’s positive outlook. Amongst the uplifting chord arrangements of the song, Sigrid determines that for now, all that matters is what you two are together, so you might as well indulge in one another. Though it’s both a sad and encouraging song at once, the pop beat gives the song life and gives hope to any listener in a similar scenario.

“Strangers” and “Don’t Kill My Vibe,” the artist’s most recent singles, are featured in the album. Though the two tracks continue to circulate among radio stations, and being repetitive tracks, are the least ambitious of the album. Despite considering the two as easy-fan favorites, comprised of catchy lyrics and predictable transitions, neither song beholds Sigrid’s authenticity or displays true purpose. Additionally, though the lyrics are repeated ten-times over, some are difficult to understand or interpret.

The last half of the album carries the most weight. Track eight, “In Vain,” consists of guitar chords accompanying Sigrid’s vocals for the majority of the song, which she uses to demonstrate the disheartening struggle of letting go of the person you love, especially as you continue to take more hits to your heart the longer you stay with them. By the time you reach the bridge the song takes a completely different turn, transitioning into a digitized version with the heavy addition of bass and echoing lyrics.

The record concludes with its rawest track, “Dynamite.” The piano accompanied ballad is simple, yet full of pure emotion. Even though the song is slightly repetitive, each verse carries beautiful melancholy images which capture accepting the fact that some people are too different to be together, no matter how they feel about each other. However difficult a note to end the album on, the placement of the track resembles the heartbreaking notes of which relationships end on as well.

Sucker Punch is the best spoonful of sugar to help the heartbreak go down. It guides listeners through emotional phases through ironically upbeat melodies, but also teaches listeners to forgo their worries on their future with their current someone.

Listen to Sucker Punch:

About Paige Stern 6 Articles
Paige Stern is a first-year journalism major from New York. Her typical day consists of jumping up and down at the sight of dogs, performing Queen covers in the shower, and crying over an episode of “This Is Us.”

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